Analyze Figurative Language in a Poem | Essay Geek

Your essay also needs a closing paragraph that discusses the poet's intent in using figurative language. You should never lose sight of the question, "What is the poem about?" Remember that poets use figuratives to create imagery, imply character and carry literal expressions into the abstract; be prepared to explain why a summer's day would compare unfavorably with a woman whom a man famously loves, when contrasted by similes, implied metaphors and personifications.

Free figurative language Essays and Papers

Figurative language is an element of poetry that creates strong imagery through unexpected comparisons and word associations. As you read a poem, finding examples of metaphors, similes, personification and other devices can provide valuable clues to its themes. Writing an analytical essay about a poem's figurative language can help you practice critical reading and writing skills by seeing how authors use this imagery to create meaning in their work.


Meter is the rhythm established by the poem

Write an essay in which you analyze the figurative language in a poem from this unit. • State which poem you chose, and explain why you chose it.

Your opening sentence, or paragraph, if your essay is lengthy, begins with the author's name; the piece's name; the intent, or what the poem is about; and the figurative language devices used, which is how the author makes you see the intent. For example: "William Shakespeare's Sonnet 18 immortalizes the poet's lover through implied metaphor, simile and personification." This creates your essay's thesis. The thesis statement has an arguable claim -- the poet's intent to immortalize, and proofs for the claim -- the three literary devices.


Analyze Figurative Language in a Poem Write an essay in which you analyze the figurative language in a poem from this unit. State which poem you chose, and explain why you chose it. Identify a key metaphor, simile, or other example of figurative language in the poem. Explain why this figurative language is important to the poem’s meaning. Analyze the meaning of the figurative language. Explain your analysis clearly. Explain how the figurative language contributes to the tone of the poem. For example, explain how the poet’s word choices build or maintain a sense of formality or informality. Cite details to support your ideas. Edit your essay for correct punctuation and spelling. Your assignment should be 1-2 pages in length. Make sure to save your assignment as a Word (.doc) document. I HearAmerica Singing Walt Whitman I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear, Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong, The carpenter singing his as he measures his plank or beam, The mason singing his as he makes ready for work, or leaves off work,The boatman singing what belongs to him in his boat, the deckhand singing on the steamboat deck, The shoemaker singing as he sits on his bench, the hatter singing as he stands, The wood-cutter’s song, the ploughboy’s on his way in the morning, or at noon intermission or at sundown, The delicious singing of the mother, or of the young wife at work, or of the girl sewing or washing, Each singing what belongs to him or her and to none else, The day what belongs to the dayat night the party of young fellows, robust, friendly, Singing with open mouths their strong melodious songs.Compositions about a poem's figurative language fall into the category of literary response. Advanced Placement English Literature essays are a good model for these Compositions about a poem's figurative language fall into the category of literary response. Advanced Placement English Literature essays are a good model for these as excellent examples of brevity and conciseness. However, you don't need to be an AP level student to write a good essay on poetic language; your essay should answer only two questions: What is the poem about, and how does the author make you understand this?You now have not only the essay's opening, but also the subjects of its three topic sentences and sections. Body paragraph one or section one, for example, will discuss similes found in the poem, paragraph/section two the implied metaphors, and paragraph/section three the personification. Each body paragraph should begin with a topic sentence that names and explains the use of figurative language: "Shakespeare's lover wins out over the summer with the implied metaphors he uses." Immediately follow with an example -- a concrete detail -- for proof: "In line 4, he notes 'Summer's lease hath all too short a date.'"